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20121006
20121014
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
observer of american politics, and culture, and also a thoughtful skull on issues of religion and culture and politics, and a seasoned observer of arab politics and with these two gentlemen as our assistance today, we will be able to take a broader look at how the arab world are looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so i'm grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussion. and at this point i'd like to invite shibley telhami up to the podium to present. >> thanks a lot, tammy. it's only good to be here. i'm going to just present, not the whole thing by some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation, i will present the highlights but i just want to give you a bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks, 700, sample, 737, that is designed to be national representative. it's an internet panel. the methodologies described in the information that will put out is also available online. i also
scholars on issues of religion and culture and politics. and the washington bureau chief, a seasoned observer of our politics. with these two gentlemen at our assistance today, we will take a broader look at how the arab world is looking at the united states in the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and fast-changing environment. i am grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussions. i like to invite him up to the podium to present the poll. >> thank you. it is always good to be here. i am going to present not the whole thing but some of the findings we can get on with. i want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by a number of networks that is designed to be a national representative of an international panel. the methodologies described in the information that will be put out is also available online. i want to say it is my pleasure and honor to partner this program, a program for international policy attitudes, particularly my colleague. he has a recen
are accusing of -- us of injecting religion into plicts. i have no problem what the archbishop does. i have no problem with the evangelists do or what the priests on the left do. it didn't bother me that during the vietnam war democratic and republican governments were led by priests encouraging people to break the law in the adage of the civil disobedience thing. so our position, separation of church and state, pluralism, so no little kid with a minority religion of some sort will feel offended or left out or feel uncomfortable. but yes, prayer in schools, a voluntary basis. worked for many, many years until the supreme court ruled differently. and i'm glad we got this question. i think there has been too much said about religion and politics. we don't believe in denominationally 6 moving in. it wasn't our side that raised the question about our president, whether he was a good christian or not. [applause] so that's our position. separation of church and state, pluralism, respect for all. >> vice president bush, four years ago you would have allowed federal financing for abortions in cases
in england. you present yourself as a secular muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you
of the religion. the religion of the book is not called islam. it is very heavily fictionalized. >> have you ever regretted writing it? >> i have been asked this question once a week for 24 years. the answer will always be no. i think it is a good buck. -- good book. people are finally being able to read it as a novel. young people, they are just coming to it fresh. some people love it, some people do not like it. >> you did not have an ordinary life. you were in hiding. you had an alias. what was your state of mind? >> very up and down. the first couple of years were very difficult. going back and looking at my journals at that time, which i have not looked at since then, it is quite obvious the person writing the journal's is very often in a state of the depression. it got easier, i felt, once i was able to begin to organize some kind of political resistance and develop a campaign with the help of a couple of human rights organizations and france to try to put pressure on european and -- your pet -- european governments to put pressure on the iranians. >> in this book, the heroes seem to be yor
of religion or lack of religion. >> i agree. well said. james, do you want to weigh in? >> no. i think if you fool around with these kind of kooky people, sometimes they come up and bite you. a mormon i understand is the church of jesus christ of latter day saint. so the mormon certainly view themselves as christian. that's good enough for me. they've got an expanding great organization. that's their view. and i accept that. i'm not voting for romney because -- not voting for romney because of his religion. i would vote for any number of great democrats that are mormon. that's not a factor to me. he ought to keep his opinions to himself if you ask me. >> i think we all agree on that point. james, thanks very much. ari, thanks to you. as well the first lady of the united states is speaking to a rally in virginia. there she is. when we come back we're going to hear what she has to say. the pace of change is accelerating. the way we... perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members k
worldwide providing an intersectional analysis of the ways race, class, sex alty, religion combine with gender to affect women's lives. today this committee is actively involved in the magazine in a number of ways. we suggestion topics for the magazine. we review books, we recruit experts to write for "ms.." and through a foundation grant "ms." sponsored writing work shops to train particularly women study scholars in various media platforms. and i remember one of those meetings where there were the older generation of us and the younger generation of us. and the older generation was i don't know why i need to be on northbound and the younger people were saying this is the way you communicate with your friends. and eleanor smeal said you all have got to get with it. so she brought us kicking and screaming into the 21st century and the magazine has stayed in the forefront of that. in addition, not only are we as scholars there working with the magazine but we're bringing the magazine into the class rooms for our students. "ms." has this wonderful classroom program. and "ms." has alw
your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talking about how your religion played a part in that. this is such an emotional issue for so many in this country. please talk personally about this if he could. -- if you could. >> i do not see how a person can separate their personal life from their public life and their faith. our faith informs us and everything we do. it informs me of how to make sure people have a chance in life. if you want to ask why i am pro- life, it is not simply because of my catholic faith. that is a factor of course. it is also because of reason and science. i think about 10 and a half years ago, my wife jan and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seventh week ultrasound for our firstborn child. we saw the heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of the been. to this day, we have nicknamed our firstborn child "bean." i believe life begins at conception. those are the reasons i am pro- life. i understand this is a difficult issue. i respect people who do not agree with m
. according to all profits and all religions and faiths, it's forbidden and it's a very ugly behavior. how can you, in order to obtain four or five additional votes or to make a party more popular than the other -- allow me, sir. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> they become at the end of the day, they do become that way. you see the problems that are facing humanity today are much different than whether a single woman goes skiing or not. there are many reforms yet to take place. many reforms as to be realized. is america a poor country? they are human beings, too. each one of them is a complete human being with many hopes and aspirations and dreams. throughout the world, 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships exists, and denying human dignity exists, unfortunately, and all of it must be reformed. >> when i hear this, i like you speaking like this, this is great, but shouldn't freedom and individuality and all those things also extend to people who just happen to be gay, and they w
don't believe that it's ever been a belief in religion. this is what i'm going to say that the christian part of barack obama's history made him did not have. another save you some of them. i believe he's christian. i have been to his church and i believe that is what he believes in. as christian and i converted to islam because i felt for women it is more protected because of their traditional role of father and mother in the home with her mother was allowed to be at home and have children with protection of the father. i thought i was a positive situation for me. it takes women off welfare and we don't have that game situation in prison situation that we would have here. but israel, i don't think we should follow their lead because i think the world looks at how americans get along with each other, not how israel gets along with america. israel's approach and the religion is an eye for an eye. they do not follow the christian approach. so when things happen to them in the international war, i feel that followed i for an eye and american doesn't follow that actually t
what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion? please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how religion played a role. and please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life. my faith informs me how to take care of the vulnerable, how to make sure that people have a chance in life. you ask me why i'm pro life? it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course, but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about 10 1/2 years ago, my wife jan and i went to mercy hospital in janesville, where i was born, for our seven-week ultrasound for our first born child. we saw that heartbeat, our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nicknamed our first born child, l liza, bean. i believe life begins at concept, those are the reasons why i'm pro life. now, i understand this is a difficult issue and i respect people who don't agree with me on this. but the policy of a romney administration wi
on the stage. i would like to ask you both what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. talk about how you came to that decision and how your religion played a part in that. this is such and emotional issue for some many people. please talk personally if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life for their faith. our faith informs us of everything we do. how to take care of the vulnerable, to make sure people have a chance in life. you ask why a pr mo-life -- i am pro-life. it is not simply because of my catholic faith. it is because of reason and science. i think of 10 1/2 years ago, my wife and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seven-week ultrasound for our firstborn child. we saw that heartbeat. our baby was in the shape of a bean. we have nicknamed our child "bean." i believe life begins at conception. i understand this is a difficult issue and i respect people that don't agree with me on this. but the policy of our administration will be to oppose abortion with the exce
on a stage such as this. and i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about howe your religion played a part in that. and this is such an emotion amish you for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this if you could. congressman ryan. >> ryan: i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. how to take care of the vulnerable and how to make sure that people have a choice in life. i'm pro life and that's not simply because of my catholic faith. but it's always because of reason and science. i think about 10 1/2 years ago my wife and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for our seven-week ultra sound for our first child. and we saw that heart beat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean and to this day, we have nicknamed our first child bean. i believe life begins at conception. i understand this is a
support capital holding rather than human values. according to all prophets and all religions and faith homosexuality is strictly forbidden. it's a very ugly behavior. how can you in order to obtain four or five additional votes or make a party more popular than the other how can you. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> translator: they become. at the end of the day they do become that way. i'm not seeing any root causes of it. the problems that are facing humanity today are much deeper than whether a single lady goes skiing or not. there are many reforms to take place, many reforms. in the united states 50 million people live in poverty. the ameriis america a poor coun? they are human beings to do. they have many hopes and aspirations. 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships do exist. denying human dignity exists. all of this must be reformed. >> when i hear you -- >> translator: allow you. >> i like you speaking like this. this is great. shouldn't freedom and individuality an
they are against abortion for everybody. i did not realize religion played such a big part again to of the government, or should play any part of ventura the government. you can have your personal views, but as far as making choices for other people, i think that is wrong. and will probably be a the downfall of their campaign. >> for you, that question at the end about personal life and religion was an important one? >> yes, i was raised a catholic. it is your own choice. i would not make a choice for somebody else's medical condition or their choice of what they want to do with their life, especially not a choice about their own body. >> thank you for your call. cnn had a debate clock. they stopped at these numbers. 41 minutes for vice president by dan and 40 minutes 12 seconds for congressman paul ryan. let's hear next from betty from houston. turn down your tv volume, please. >> yes, thank you. i thought the debate is very good. yes or a democrat, and i found buys president biden was very clear. he was concise. he was a very factual. i did not feel that credibility with paul r
, on a stage such as this. and i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion has played in yourview. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that and please, this is such an emotional issue for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan? >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the you have they arable. of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now, you want to ask basically why i'm pro-life, it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten and a half years ago, my wife janna and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seven-week ultrasound for our first born child and we saw that heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nicknamed our first born child, liza,
, the largest muslim population. is that more of a question of religion or geography or when you talk about geography you're talking about religion? >> it's about technology creating new geographical communities where you can have a pan islam. my previous book was about the indian ocean. >> rose: "monsoon" as i remember. >> right and the islam in southeast asia is very diffeent --. >> rose: you talk to them and that's what they tell you. >> but because of technology muslims from one part of the greater middle east to the other part and to the muslim community in southeast asia can now interact with each other and rediscover their faith as a unit rather than a separate groups. so it creates a new geography of islam. it's still about space so each place interacts with every other so in ordeto dersnd iyou have to understand the connections and disaggregate it and understand that people become engaged about who owns the mountains in kashmir. best example is india and china. india and china, two gate civilizations, developed completely separated divided by the high wall of the himalayas. now ind
. we'll talk about the first amendment and with regard to religion, how? >> religion clauses are the first part of the first amendment it was very, very important to the founders and the key words are free exercise of religion. that means more than just able to worship the knod - god of your choice but live the dictates of your religion. in 1990, the supreme court started to change that provision. the supreme court simply said. state and federal governments can now infringe on religious freedom as long as they do it in a neutral fashion. with obama care you can see even religious organization have to subsidize abortion and in the case of sandra fluke who was in the democratic convention. >> gretchen: it is the naked constitution. check it out. it is on sale today. do you think a victim of a shooting should hold a gun maker responsible? did jack have to die when the titantic went down? wait until you see what they found out. happy birthday to scotty mcquery. so much success. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] you can always measure the growth of your children by the way they cle
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)